Boston Code Camp 2017 Re-cap

I had a really great time presenting “Connecting Salesforce & Office 365 using Microsoft PowerApps & Flow”. For once the demo gods were kind to me as a I demonstrated creating leads from an Excel document, and generating Salesforce Tasks that get created in a SharePoint list, etc.

For those looking for slides – you can grab them here: Microsoft Flow O365 Salesforce

I also had a really great time joining some of my fellow Microsoft MVP’s on Betsy Weber’s panel for “How to become an MVP.” All in all a great event – kudos to the organizers, volunteers, speakers, and attendees that made it happen. Hopefully I’ll have the opportunity to present again next year.

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Presenting at Boston Code Camp 2017

I’m very excited to be speaking at my very first Code Camp on March 25th at the Microsoft Sales & Technology Center in Burlington. My session is titled: Connecting Salesforce.com & Office 365 using Microsoft Flow & PowerApps which hopefully is pretty straightforward for what I plan on covering. I am a huge fan of Microsoft Flow and am very excited to have the opportunity to “spread the gospel” of some of the amazing possibilities with this service.

I have always been a little hesitant to speak at Code Camp since I self-identify as being somewhere between a no-code developer and an actual developer. Most of the presenters are hardcore developers and I would be afraid of putting my audience off by not spending my session in Visual Studio. However, I am hoping my topic will resonate with attendees as I’m starting to see lots of organizations move towards Office 365 and there’s a mix of Salesforce.com & Dynamics 365 from a CRM perspective. I am also seeing a surge in data orchestration tools such as IFTT, Microsoft Flow, Zapier, etc. which is a good conversation to have especially when it comes to integrating with custom LOB applications which will require RESTFUL interfaces to enable these tools.

So here’s to an awesome event, and check out the website for more details!
https://www.bostoncodecamp.com/CC27

Is Microsoft Flow the replacement for SharePoint Workflows?

I recently had the privilege to co-present a session on Microsoft Flow & PowerApps at the Microsoft Beyond US Roadshow in Hartford. I am a huge fan of Microsoft Flow and have done several sessions on showing how you can orchestrate data across Dropbox, OneDrive, SharePoint & Salesforce with clicks & not code. One of the attendees in my session asked a very common question that I thought would make a good short blog post: “Is Flow the replacement for SharePoint Workflows?”.

Over the past few years I have built dozens of business applications leveraging the SharePoint platform to route requests through approval processes, provided metrics for turnaround time on requests, and automated non-value added steps. These solutions undoubtedly would leverage the SharePoint workflow engine for sending e-mails, assigning tasks, etc. Since Microsoft introduced the Workflow Manager in SharePoint 2013, there has not been any additional enhancements to their workflow engine. Compounded with the fact that SharePoint 2016 did not include an updated version of SharePoint 2016 it would make sense to assume that Flow is the replacement for SharePoint Workflows.

However, I would argue that Microsoft Flow is really positioned as the next generation of business process management applications vs an outright replacement to SharePoint Workflows. From a feature parity perspective not all of the SharePoint Workflow actions are available in Flow (yet they seem to be added all the time). At the time of this blog there aren’t the basic string manipulation actions, or copy items (also not available in 2013 but are in 2010), content approval/publishing, check-in/check-out, and wait for field changes in list items. There is also the caveat that in order to access on-premises data that you would need to setup a Gateway in order to make it accessible to Microsoft’s cloud.

Microsoft Flow provides much more capability than SharePoint does which might initially frighten some Enterprise customers. While there is a lot of value in being able to orchestrate data across both line of business & public clouds there definitely needs to be some up front planning to ensure that you do not jeopardize the integrity of your company’s data. For example it is absolutely possible to develop a Flow to copy files from your OneDrive for Business to your personal DropBox.

Finally, from a licensing perspective Microsoft Flow is a pay by the drink kind of service (technically pay by the Flow run). There’s a bit of  math but essentially you are allocated an allotment of Flow runs per user in your Office 365 tenant based on your plan. Be sure to check out Microsoft’s Flow Pricing page for up to the minute guidance. Whereas with SharePoint Workflows it’s essentially as many workflow runs as what your infrastructure can support.

So getting back to the original question – is Microsoft Flow the direct replacement for SharePoint Workflows? In my opinion – No. Microsoft Flow is the evolution of business process management allowing you to build elegant solutions which have the ability to orchestrate data across various line of business applications leveraging “clicks” and not code. Combined with PowerApps as your mobile/responsive front-end the barrier to creating enterprise applications has absolutely been lowered to where you no longer need a team of developers to create basic applications.

Hope this helps & happy Flow-ing.

 

 

Leveraging Microsoft Flow to Capture #YammerWins for Knowledge Management

First off – I want to give credit to Naomi Moneypenny for the idea of tagging threads in Yammer with #YammerWin. (Or at least I believe it was her) I think that’s a brilliant idea and helps to demonstrate that you would use a product like Yammer for more than just water cooler gossip. When I started to think about the job though of trolling Yammer for #YammerWins it occurred to me that it’s kind of a copy & paste intensive process. There’s also no quick way of getting a count of how many #YammerWins you have, etc. Sure you can click the #YammerWin hashtag in your group and then see all the different threads which certainly works but it’s not super organized.

I’m a consultant and development is what we tend to do – but to be honest, I don’t have the warm & fuzzies about doing custom development on top of Yammer. T

So then Microsoft Flow came along and I got a really cool idea. What if I could build a Flow that would do the data collection for me and then store it in a SharePoint list? Once it’s in a list I can do anything from kicking off workflows, to building mini-reports for management, etc. Talk about a #MicrosoftFlowWin

So I did & here’s what my Flow looks like:

YammerWin

  1. The trigger is when a new item is created in a Group (point at a Yammer Group)
  2. I include a condition, if the Message Text contains #yammerwin
  3. If yes, it creates an item in a SharePoint list

My SharePoint list has a few extra columns (MessageText, URL, and CreatedAt) and I map the following attributes from the Yammer post so that I can see the message text, when it was created, and the URL to the actual object.

YammerWin2

Once that’s all set I let the flow fire and when someone in the group sends a message which includes #YammerWin, the Flow picks it up and creates an item in SharePont:

YammerWinSharePoint

As many of you know – once the item is in SharePont, you can do anything! You can build custom reports to show management, have a workflow that assigns this to one of your Knowledge Management librarians for curation, etc. The URL also allows your librarian to go ahead and view the thread for context should the message text not contain all the information that they would need to help build the knowledge management record.

For those building Knowledge Management Portals in SharePoint – this is a really great way to start to capture your #YammerWins in a structured fashion.

Cheers to Naomi for the idea, and to the Microsoft Flow team for building the technology!

Well done! #MicrosoftFlowWin!